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Disrupted sleep-wake cycle might be a measure for preclinical Alzheimer’s.

National Institute of Health – National Institute on Aging - Report - Disrupted sleep-wake cycle might be a measure for preclinical Alzheimer's - People with dementia due to Alzheimer’s disease are known to have disrupted sleep. New NIH-funded research, published online Jan. 29, 2018, in JAMA Neurology, links a disrupted sleep-wake cycle to an earlier, preclinical disease phase, in which people have evidence of the disease but no symptoms. The study, by researchers at the Knight Alzheimer's Disease Research Center at Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri, suggests that a fragmented sleep-wake cycle might be explored as a biomarker for preclinical Alzheimer's.

Leafy greens linked with slower age-related cognitive decline.

National Institute of Health – National Institute on Aging - Report - Leafy greens linked with slower age-related cognitive decline - A recent report in the journal Neurology found that a diet containing approximately one serving of green leafy vegetables per day is associated with slower age-related cognitive decline.

Treating muscle and brain degenerative diseases.

News-Medical.Net on March 21 covered UCLA research establishing the molecular basis of, and potential treatment for, IBMPFD (inclusion body myopathy Paget disease with frontotemporal dementia). Dr. Ming Guo, professor in the department of neurology at David Geffen School of Medicine, led the study.

New methods to combat cell damage that accumulates with age.

Dr. Ming Guo, Professor of Neurology and Pharmacology, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA was featured in a November 23 UCLA Newsroom article about the discoveries of mitochondial DNA that may help delay onset of age-related diseases.

Exercise, healthy lifestyle can help fight Alzheimer's, UCLA researchers find.

KABC Channel 7 News reported August 16 on a study at UCLA that exercise and followed a Mediterranean-style diet could benefit those at risk for Alzheimer's disease.

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